• Being concrete about the benefits of tax efficient index investment

    In my last post I discussed the methods that a UK individual could use to make investments. There were plenty of different methods, all with their own unique tradeoffs.

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  • Tax-efficient and financing-efficient UK individual investing

    In my last post I gave an example of a situation where individual investors might want to borrow money for investment purposes. This post will give an overview of the methods that individuals can use to achieve that leverage efficiently. I will also cover tax considerations, some of which may be relevant even to unleveraged positions. Much of what I cover here will be UK specific, particularly when it comes to taxes.

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  • The case for leverage in personal investing

    The standard advice for personal investing that I see all around the web is to put your money into one or more low cost equity index tracking funds. Commentators also sometimes recommend an allocation to bonds (e.g. a 60/40 split between stocks and bonds), though the popularity of this advice seems to become less common with every passing month of the bull market.

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  • Portfolio mean-variance optimisation in the browser

    This is just to announce that I’ve written a small tool to visualise the risk/reward tradeoffs associated with investing in a diversified portfolio of risky assets.

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  • Faster ordered maps for Java

    Sorted maps are useful alternatives to standard unordered hashmaps. Not only do they tend to make your programs more deterministic, they also make some kinds of queries very efficient. For example, one thing we frequently want to do at work is find the most recent observation of a sparse timeseries as of a particular time. If the series is represented as an ordered mapping from time to value, then this this question is easily answered in log time by a bisection on the mapping.

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